There’s nothing like a wrought iron fence to add a little grandeur to your property, but their beauty does require maintenance. Here’s a quick guide to restoring a rusted or chipped fence.


1: Use a wire brush to gently clean all dust, debris and reside off your fence. The keyword here is “gently,” because highly abrasive scrubbing can damage the integrity of wrought iron.

2: Apply sandpaper to any sections with cracked or peeling paint. Use a soft back-and-forth motion until the surface is smooth enough to avoid noticeable edges once it’s been painted. Do not sandpaper any areas that don’t need it! Remember, you’re going for gentle.

3: Protect the surrounding area by covering it with a tarp or tablecloth. Pay extra attention to windows, which will be a hassle to clean if they get sprayed, and plants, which can wither and die if exposed to the toxicity of paint.

4: Apply a primer to the fence. It should be rust-inhibitive for maximum longevity, especially if you live in a cold or rainy town where the elements are iron’s natural enemy.

5: Wait the recommended amount of drying time. It should say on the can how long that should be.

6: Apply your paint. Again, it should be rust-inhibitive, and you’ll probably want something made specifically for use on exterior enamel. Keep the can at least six inches from the fence when spraying.

How does it look? Good as new? Are there any areas that didn’t quite turn out right? Don’t worry, you don’t need to repaint the whole thing again: Just visit www.indital.com and have a look at their replacement industrial parts.

A Quick Guide to Restoring a Rusted or Chipped Fence

14 thoughts on “A Quick Guide to Restoring a Rusted or Chipped Fence

  • December 11, 2013 at 2:47 pm
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    The good news is that we don’t have a fence so we don’t need to worry anything about restoration and spending for all those haha. These are good tips though for house owners who have fences.

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  • December 11, 2013 at 2:50 pm
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    This can also help prolong the life of the fence and related structures.

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  • December 11, 2013 at 3:39 pm
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    This sounds great! Maybe I can apply these things when I get my own house already! :)

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  • December 11, 2013 at 4:38 pm
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    This is complete and very helpful tips, that fence would be so lovely in a house. But in this village we can’t put that kind we need a fence that is at leveled up to our neck. :)

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  • December 11, 2013 at 8:37 pm
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    Very good tips here for restoring fences which reminds me we should be looking into ours.

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  • December 11, 2013 at 8:43 pm
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    Using a primer before applying the paint is a must in order for the paint to last long. Great tips, this is also what we do to restore rusted gate and fences :)

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  • December 12, 2013 at 1:26 am
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    this is very useful in our farm to look after our fence! we have huge fence there so the cows in the farm won wander anywhere else haha love all the tips!

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  • December 12, 2013 at 8:09 am
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    I hope to apply this learning to our fence. I keep on cleaning the gardening but forget to take care the fence.

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  • December 12, 2013 at 5:29 pm
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    I like that kind of fence in your picture… here in our house, we solve our rusted fence by repainting it only. hahahha

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  • December 13, 2013 at 6:45 pm
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    My father uses a chemical called stripsol to get rid of the rusts from the iron. He just brushes it on the rusted iron, leave it overnight then wash it the next day. Voila, the rusts are gone.

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  • December 16, 2013 at 3:43 am
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    we don’t have a fence now but I will keep this post in mind when my dream house comes true hihi

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  • December 16, 2013 at 4:30 am
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    This is very basic in maintaining a metal or steel fence to retain its beauty and to lengthen its life. Good job!

    Reply

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